?

Log in

entries friends calendar profile AT: Gate of Ivory, Gate of Horn Previous Previous Next Next
The current crisis is taken straight from the Litany: 2. Sedition, privy conspiracy, and rebellion. - Wemyss's Appalling Hobby:
From the Party Guilty of Committing 'Gate of Ivory, Gate of Horn'
wemyss
wemyss
The current crisis is taken straight from the Litany: 2. Sedition, privy conspiracy, and rebellion.


 

Let us recall our subject.

 

Abroad, there has been battle and murder, and sudden death.

 

At home, sedition, privy conspiracy, and rebellion.

 

Things have actually reached the point at which someone such as I finds himself in agreement with Tony Benn, David Blunkett, and Nick Clegg, in vindicating the rights and privileges of a Tory MP so wet you could shoot snipe over him.

 

Granted that the world is descending swiftly into an anarchic and Hobbesian state, of the warfare of all against all – ask any ship’s captain off Somalia – it is imperative that the free nations be at the ready and capable of action.  Yet at this moment, there is a constitutional crisis in the United Kingdom the gravity of which cannot be overstated.  To this, we shall now turn.

 

Damian Green MP is the Conservative shadow minister for immigration.  Parliament is currently prorogued.  The new parliament convenes on 3 December – the State Opening and the Queen’s Speech from the Throne – and the Commons will then choose a new Speaker.

 

On Thursday, 27 November, even as the terror attack fell upon Mumbai, nine counterterrorism officers of the Metropolitan Police arrested Mr Green on charges that he had received leaks from Whitehall.  He was held for nine hours and released in the small hours of Friday, 28 November.  His constituency office, his home, and his Commons offices were searched and his papers and data were seized.

 

I’m sorry, I’ll read that again.  Nine counterterrorism officers of the Yard arrested a sitting MP over Whitehall leaks, seized his papers – including confidential communications from his constituents – and searched his offices in the Royal Palace of Westminster.  On the same day as actual terrorism involving British victims, and quite possibly British terrorists, was occurring in Mumbai.

 

Also on 28 November, a prosecution, of a journalist and her alleged ‘leakers’, brought under the same laws, was stopped by the judge on the ground that there was no case at law to answer.

 

None of the alleged leaks to Mr Green were of sensitive or national security information; they simply embarrassed ZANU-Labour politically.

 

In that respect, they are not to be compared to the leaks regarding military base issues that were the basis of a young Labour frontbencher’s posturing in the House when Mrs Thatcher was PM.  I refer of course to that notorious recipient and user of leaks, Gordon Brown.

 

The current Speaker of the House of Commons, Michael Martin, better known as ‘Gorbals Mick’, is a nakedly partisan Old Labour thug most famous for fiddling his expenses and for having been made Speaker, in defiance of convention, when it was in fact the Tories’s turn to supply the Speaker.  (It is not seriously suggested that Sir George Young, as Speaker, would have countenanced a police raid on the House of Commons for a single moment.  And one can only imagine with glee the reaction of Bernard Weatherill in his day, or indeed Betty Boothroyd in hers.)

 

Thursday, 27 November, was the last day in post for outgoing Met Commissioner Sir Ian Blair, a bitter hater of anyone insufficiently Labourite and PC (and, no, that does not stand for ‘Police Constable’, not that he’s been at all supportive of them, either, the bootlicking Lefty sod).

 

David Cameron and Boris Johnson were given five minutes’s warning of the raid.

 

Gordon Brown insists that he, unlike Dave and Boris, had no advance knowledge of the raid.

 

Jacqui Smith insists that she, unlike Dave and Boris, had no advance knowledge of the raid.  Indeed, she insists that no minister, unlike Dave and Boris, had advance knowledge of the raid.

 

The senior civil servant in charge of the Cabinet Office insists that he and he alone, without any ministerial involvement, brought the coppers in.

 

The Met insist that they acted alone, without any political animus and without any political influence.

 

The Speaker’s Office and the Serjeant at Arms say simply that ‘procedures were followed’ in the raid on the Commons offices of the hon. Member for Ashford.

 

You might think that it strains the bounds of coincidence that this raid, which must have been authorised at the highest levels, simply happened to occur on the last day of Ian Blair’s watch.  You might think that; I couldn’t possibly comment.

 

You might think that it strains the bounds of credulity that this raid, which must have been authorised at the highest levels, was carried out without ministerial pressure.  You might think that; I couldn’t possibly comment.

 

You might think that it strains the bounds of credulity that this raid, which must have been authorised at the highest levels, was carried out without the guilty foreknowledge of the PM and the Home Secretary.  You might think that; I couldn’t possibly comment.

 

You might think that it is typical of the Labour government that something was carried through on the nod, no names no pack drill, so as to make technically true the PM’s and Home Secretary’s claims of no specific foreknowledge, and that Labour are rather good at lying to the nation and the House without actually being chargeable with precise dishonesty.  You might think that; I couldn’t possibly comment.

 

You might think that only a decade of Labour’s steady and unrelenting politicisation of the Speakership, the Civil Service, and the police, could have created an environment in which these once-neutral guardians of the privileges of the House, the independence of government, and the liberties of the subject could be thus held down and buggered raw.  You might think that; I couldn’t possibly comment.

 

You might consider that the Speaker and his officers have failed in their fundamental duty to uphold parliamentary freedom and parliamentary liberty.  You might think that; I couldn’t possibly comment.

 

You might think that this raid, which must have been authorised at the highest levels, gives the lie to the assurances made to the nation and the House regarding the limitations upon the Anti-Terrorism legislation.  You might think that; I couldn’t possibly comment.

 

You might think that this raid, which must have been authorised at the highest levels, constitutes a contempt of Parliament.  You might think that; I couldn’t possibly comment.

 

You might consider that this raid, which must have been authorised at the highest levels, is the sort of thing that brought Strafford to the scaffold, led to the Civil War, and resulted in the judicial murder of Charles 1st.  You might think that; I couldn’t possibly comment.

 

You might also conclude – and here I shall comment, to say that you are perfectly correct to conclude – that this squalid abuse of power must surely awaken the House to the defence of its rights; must make the House to see how it has been emasculated by Labour; must alert the subject to the prospect that the government, if allowed to get away with this, can no longer be held to account, and that the subject’s correspondence with his or her Member is now no longer safe from police seizure; and that British democracy stands upon a precipice.

 

This is as grave a constitutional crisis as that faced by Speaker Lenthall in 1642.  ‘May it please your Majesty, I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place but as the House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here.’

 

Well, it didn’t please His Majesty, and it won’t please Iosef Vissarionovich Brown, but that is the constitutional point at issue.  And Gorbals Mick has failed the test.

 

On 3 December, Black Rod will see the doors of the House slammed in his face, and be forced to knock thrice before being granted entry to summon the Commons to attend the Queen in the Lords.  The danger now, however, is within the House itself, on the Treasury Bench.

 

If the United Kingdom is to remain a free nation, it is essential that the case against Damian Green be utterly crushed and repudiated; that instead of being re-elected, Gorbals Mick be stood before a Select Committee and questioned to within an inch of his life; and that resignations at the highest levels, in the Civil Service, in the Met, and amongst ministers – up to and including the PM – follow immediately.  For the world in its present straits requires Britain, and a Britain that is free, with an accountable government under the rule of law.  Nothing less will serve; and if ministers cannot see that, it is time they were hurled from the seats of power in so ruinous a fashion that no government should ever again be thus tempted towards tyranny.

Tags: , , ,
Current Music: London Symphony Orchestra - Variations on an Original Theme 'Enigma' Op. 36 (1986 Digital Remaster):

3 comments or Leave a comment
Comments
(Deleted comment)
wemyss From: wemyss Date: November 30th, 2008 02:33 pm (UTC) (Link)

So they have.

I mean, my God, I'm now applauding Den Bloody MacShane.*

And it only gets worse. Watch, as they say, This Space.
________________
* Actually, I rather often do, and he's really rather reasonable - for which read, On the Right - in most ways. However, I imagine he now regrets calling Basher's resignation over 42 days a 'comic opera stunt', what?

Edited at 2008-11-30 02:36 pm (UTC)
pathology_doc From: pathology_doc Date: November 30th, 2008 10:29 pm (UTC) (Link)
Welcome to Labor - because after all, if you don't vote Labor, the nasty Conservatives will take away your rights!

*Eyes internet nervously*
wemyss From: wemyss Date: December 1st, 2008 02:09 pm (UTC) (Link)

Cheek.

And, also, quite.
3 comments or Leave a comment