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More rumination than essay: Divers Potterverse musings - Wemyss's Appalling Hobby:
From the Party Guilty of Committing 'Gate of Ivory, Gate of Horn'
wemyss
wemyss
More rumination than essay: Divers Potterverse musings

Well, we’ve had enough humour lately.  (Not that I won’t do more.)


On the Names of Centaurs

Bane.  Magorian.  Ronan.

As a matter of denotation, there’s nothing particularly centaurish about these names, and indeed they share no common thread.  Yet connotationally, they sound right.

Then there is Firenze.  He seems as great a misfit in the list, in the sound and music of the list, as he is in his views on humans.

Perhaps that is why he is thus named: to underline his standing apart.

However, I trust most of you recall that ‘Firenze’ is in fact the name that Italians so misguidedly use for Florence.  (Times headline often cited as classic sample of insularity and Blimpishness: ‘Fog in Channel; Continent cut off.’)

And there is reputed to be a wood outside Florence, in which there is a cave, over the entrance of which is carved a warning.  Something about abandoning hope and all ye who enter and All That.

So if Book Seven involves Firenze as a sort of psychopomp or Dantean Vergil-guide, well, you can’t say you weren’t warned.

Where IS Godric’s Hollow?

By North American standards, place names with the ‘hollow’ element are uncommon in England, Wales, and Scotland.  ‘Godric’s Hollow’ seems at first glance a very unlikely name for even a part-Wizarding hamlet or village in the UK.  And this remains so even if one also includes ‘hallow’ as a place name element.  Ramsey Hollow, in Cambs, is perhaps the best known, and it is a geographical designation that has not given its name to the surrounding settlements.

Nonetheless, if you look very hard, you will be surprised at the number of places that could conceivably boast a ‘Godric’s Hollow’ – and most of these, not surprisingly, are in the West Country, as is typical of JKR.  I have excluded entries from the National Archives that are evidently related to ‘hollow ways’ or – and this is very common in Cornwall – that likely derive from the Cornish surname, Hollow.

The following list shows areas in which local nomenclature could very easily include a ‘Blank’s Hollow’ as a place name:

 

            Ston Easton BANES / Somerset

            Iver Bucks

            Little Horwood Bucks

            Ramsey Hollow Cambs

            Var. Cornwall – note: Hollow is a surname in Cornwall

            Norbury Hollow Derbs

            Eastcott Devon

            Affpuddle Dorset

            Briantspuddle Dorset

            Broadway Dorset

            Horton Dorset

            Melbury Abbas Dorset

            Churcham Gloucs

            Elmore Gloucs

            Miserden Gloucs

            Newland (Forest of Dean) Gloucs

            Stroud Gloucs

            Var. Gloucs

            Chine Hollow IOW

            Weston Favell Northants

            Hackford, N Riding Yorks (now N Yorks)

            Headington Oxon

            Hinton St George Somerset

            Long Ashton Somerset

            Marksbury / Nyland w Batcombe Somerset

            Somerton Erleigh Somerset

            S Cadbury Somerset

            Stoke sub Hamdon Somerset

            Burbage Wilts

            Coombe Wilts

            Calne Wilts

            Corsley Wilts

            Edington Wilts

            Laverstock / Sarum Wilts

            Mere Wilts

            Milford Hollow Wilts

            Shaftesbury Wilts

            Tisbury Wilts

My own preference, with reference to the Flight Over Bristol (not to be confused entirely with either the Flight Into Egypt or the Flight of the Earls) on All Hallows’s Eve 1981, is for Somerset, although a Gloucs address would certainly make things easy for Hagrid also.   
 

Hotspur, the Kingmaker, and Warfare in the North

Please tell me I’m not the only one who wonders if – given that nomenclature so often is destiny in the Potterverse – there’s not a confrontation brewing between Percy and Neville?

Why Don’t We Do It in the Road?

I have no idea whether JKR admits there is Sirius-Remus subtext, much less whether it is intended.  There can be little question that Greyback – unlike Slughorn, thank you, who is the very model of a particular type of don – is a metaphorical paedophile, just as in some ways lycanthropy is analogous to Aids / HIV and Greyback is a deliberate vector of infection.

I will say this, though.  There is something intrinsically bent about werewolves.  Not merely intensely sexual – as any Latin grammar will attest – but bent.  The Lykaia is merely the sacral and thus respectable face of the Greek initiatory ritual for youths (similar to the Brauron rites of maidens being ‘bears for Artemis’, this being the role being enacted by the prepubescent Helen when she was abducted by Pirithous and Theseus, long before Paris was so much as breeched.  Richard Jenkyns once made a jest about the Virginia Woolf genteel method of assessing Xenophon, and how her ‘Greek is the only language’ sounded awfully like, ‘Liberty is the only shop’; ever since, I have had in the back of mind a scene of little Helen, pouting and unwilling to go off to serve Artemis for a bit, and being coaxed, ‘But darling, don’t you want to be a bear for Artemis?’).  Part of the passage rites involved a period of withdrawal from society into the wild, where the lad and his older lover-mentor, eromenos and erastes, lived rough and were metaphoric ‘werewolves’ for a time, particularly in the Cretan pederastic tradition (see the fragments of Ephorus that Strabo quotes so extensively).

Certainly, one of the most subtly homoerotic and most Greek works of recent literature is a short story by the exceedingly gay HH Munro, ‘Saki’, entitled ‘Gabriel-Ernest’, found here 

But there’s more to it than that.  As Alby Stone and BobTrubshaw have pointed out, there is a notable relationship of dog to (were-)wolf – Moony and Padfoot – in which both share liminal space, one as psychopomp and the other as shaman and outlaw both; and the weargh is an outlaw – including, as Suetonius attests, the gay man, traditionally reviled by the German tribes – who has been declared legally equivalent to a werewolf and thus not merely outlawed but susceptible of being lawfully hunted and killed in any season.  Warg and argr (gay ‘bottom’) are cognate.

Make of it what you will.

Just Because They’re Minor Characters Doesn’t Make Them Death-Eaters

For whatever reason – perhaps that they are by way of being pretty much blank slates – Zacharias Smith and Justin Finch-Fletchley (you are of course certain that it was until quite recently ‘ffinch’) seem to keep cropping up as potential DEs in fanfiction.

This baffles me, and especially by this point in the narrative.

Yes, Smith is a snarky little ‘Pureblood’, a sort of minor and marginally less offensive Malfoy.  That does not seem to me sufficient grounds for suspecting his loyalties – and even less so now, in light of his presumed relationship to the late Hephzibah Smith, in which case, if that is in fact so, he has a personal grudge against Tom Riddle as having both murdered one of his relations and as having stolen a family heirloom of considerable worth and power.

As for Justin….  Words fail me.  He’s a Muggle-born Hufflepuff, for God’s sake (although if ‘Fletchley’ is to suggest a derivation in the matrilineal descent from long-ago residents of the village of Fletching in E Sussex, he may not be quite so Muggle as he believes, in light of its persistent local legend of the witch ‘Nan Tuck’).  In any event, again, not only is there nothing in his known back-story that suggests he would ever become a DE even were Riddle to admit a ‘mudblood’ to the ranks, it were impossible to create such a back-story that is not in serious conflict with what little we do know about everyone’s favourite Etonian manqué.  (I shan’t even discuss some of the wilder overseas misapprehensions about Our Justin, such as the notion that a double-barrelled name suggests that his parents were a leftist married to a feminist.  No, really.  Why do people publish aggressively ill-informed speculations and openly assert matters that would be silly on their face if they possessed even a common knowledge of British life?  Do they wish to look silly?)


Draco Malfoy: Villain or Comic Character?

There is, I should think, no question but that all of us have one or two writers who deeply influence the very way in which we think, let alone write; many of us have more than two, but always have an inspirer-in-chief or perhaps three such.  Notably, for instance, ajhalluk is a literary heir of DLS.  Other people have other inspirations, and for some those inspirations are merely the BNF of the week.  I have never disguised the debt that my mental fabric as a whole owes to Anthony Price and, especially, JIM Stewart – that is, Michael Innes.  In one sense, though, you may also add Josephine Tey to the mix, and in particular, her philosophy of historiography and of criminal intent as expressed by Inspector Alan Grant in The Daughter of Time.

What Grant says in that work is that one of the surest shortcuts to criminality is to be able to believe two contradictory conclusions at once: the foundation of moral as of logical idiocy.

Draco Malfoy is quite clever in canon.  In some respects, indeed, he is markedly intelligent.  He is not only a quite decent student, he is a gifted natural mimic and wit, although what he mocks and how he does so is reprehensible.  Nor is he an icy character with an eye on the main chance, as Lucius is and as Draco wishes and tries desperately to be: he has a hot head and a hot heart, regularly revealed, and is in fact a good deal more of a Black than he is a Malfoy.

What is important is that, until Book Six, he might well reason impeccably, with superficial logical validity, and always reach the dead-wrong conclusions about the issues of the day, mortally important ones, because he took his premisses from Lucius, and those premisses are simply wrong.

Should he continue to hold as truth those principles, should he continue to regard them as his first principles, there is no question but that he will end up on the wrong side of history, an enlisted volunteer in the ranks of evil.

Yet there is an increasing likelihood that he is already beginning to rethink those principles.  Should he do so successfully, and survive the process, then, yes, we have the much-mooted prospect of the Redeemed Draco.

However, a man may rethink his fundamental principles without utterly changing his character.  Certainly war changes those who survive it: there is no reason to insist – indeed it is in fact unreasonable to insist – that the post-War characters will still be the same in manner and character as they were as schoolchildren.  The question is, How radical a change may one expect?

My own answer is a simple one.  A Redeemed Draco Malfoy will nonetheless be, recognisably, Draco Malfoy.  His wit may become less vitriolic, his principles will be better, but he should not emerge utterly changed.  The wit will still be there, and many of the mannerisms.  In fact, a Redeemed Draco is likely to emerge as a perfect foil for a Comedy of Manners: no longer evil, less cruel, but still caustic, snide, gloriously snobbish, pompous, and All That.  A dash of Snape and goodish dollop of Slughorn, in fact.  Take from canon Draco, by some process of redemption, rethinking, and repentance, the viciousness of his principles, leave him his mannerisms and all too human foibles – ones we have seen in Sirius already and in James Potter – and you will have a post-War, crankily endearing, lovably exasperating Draco Malfoy.  In fact, a richly comic character, part upper-class twit, part Oscar Wilde, part Colonel Blimp, with a dash of, say, Boris Johnson tossed in.

What you will not have in any conceivably canon-congruent post-War world is a leather-trousered, Armani-wearing, Queer-as-Folk Draco, if only because he would still have as his tailors the Wizarding equivalent of, say, Dege & Skinner, or at worst Gieves & Hawkes, rather than the unspeakable Armani.

Here endeth the Lesson.

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Comments
sgt_majorette From: sgt_majorette Date: April 30th, 2006 07:00 pm (UTC) (Link)
Okay, got it.

So now tell us why Prof. McGonagall always seems ever so slightly outside the loop, as if Dumbledore doesn't quite trust her?

She had to have been at school at the same time as Tommy Marvel; back when I was reading unwemysslich fanfic, a lot of authors postulated a romantic link between the two. That would do it, except the plot holes that open up tend to fill with slop and treacle.

Enlighten our ignorance, best of men...
wemyss From: wemyss Date: April 30th, 2006 07:07 pm (UTC) (Link)

Ah. Thank you.

I suppose it to be a combination of Victorian attitudes towards even the most accomplished of women; his always recalling that he was once her teacher; and his firm belief in operational secrecy and what is laughingly called plausible deniability. In short, 'Be good, sweet maid, and let who will be clever', perhaps.
aillil From: aillil Date: April 30th, 2006 07:08 pm (UTC) (Link)
Our Justin, such as the notion that a double-barrelled name suggests that his parents were a leftist married to a feminist

*headdesk*

Do they wish to look silly?

That's not it, I believe, as I found out during my poll about class membership two months ago. They just don't know, can't imagine really, that there are people in the world who seem very similar on the surface, but whose culture is vastly different once you get past the outer levels. I was stunned speechless, to be sure, how much most of them were apparently of the opinion that the possessions of a person equal not only their status but also their class in society!
wemyss From: wemyss Date: April 30th, 2006 07:14 pm (UTC) (Link)

I missed that.

Where might one find the poll?

Possessions as class. Dear God. Please, no one tell Gordon Brown.
wren_chan From: wren_chan Date: May 1st, 2006 02:18 am (UTC) (Link)
(I shan’t even discuss some of the wilder overseas misapprehensions about Our Justin, such as the notion that a double-barrelled name suggests that his parents were a leftist married to a feminist.


*looks warily about before poking up her head* --but, Wemyss luv, I am a Yank, my parents are very much a feminist and a leftist, and my name's Craft-Rendon.

...and yet I still know that Our Justin is sort of U (inasmuchas I understand U) and why it was significant that he was 'down for Eton'...

..but then, I read a lot.
wemyss From: wemyss Date: May 1st, 2006 02:38 pm (UTC) (Link)

Yes, well, as you note, YOU are well-read.

And I imagine that my own first instinct with an American with a double-barrelled surname wd be to presume a dash of feminism in the marriage. But at least we recognise that the likely assumptions as to why, differ on either side the Pond.
tunxeh From: tunxeh Date: May 1st, 2006 06:09 am (UTC) (Link)
So much fascinating and well-thought-out detail! It's hard to absorb it all. Though the tiny font doesn't help.

Please tell me I’m not the only one who wonders if – given that nomenclature so often is destiny in the Potterverse – there’s not a confrontation brewing between Percy and Neville?

And here I was thinking P's name referred to the Percival legend, given the other Arthurian names in his family. Interesting theory, though.

I have no idea whether JKR admits there is Sirius-Remus subtext, much less whether it is intended.

I'm pretty sure it's unintended, given how miserable Sirius was at being stuck in a house with Remus in OotP. And that if lycanthropy is metaphor for anything, it's either menstruation or AIDS, not homosexuality. But that topic would lead us astray from canon speculation...

in light of his presumed relationship to the late Hephzibah Smith, in which case, if that is in fact so, he has a personal grudge against Tom Riddle as having both murdered one of his relations and as having stolen a family heirloom of considerable worth and power.

Or rather, he would have such a grudge, if he had seen what Harry saw in Dumbledore's pensieve. As it is, he is the Doubting Thomas of the DA's apostles, quick to disbelieve and require proof of anything Harry claims.

Notably, for instance, ajhalluk is a literary heir of DLS.

Who is a what? Should I recognize or care about those names?

What Grant says in that work is that one of the surest shortcuts to criminality is to be able to believe two contradictory conclusions at once

I take great exception to that. If one's mind is so narrow as to be able to hold only one thing in it at a time, one can be qualified for very little; president of the USA perhaps, and who more criminal today?

Yet there is an increasing likelihood that he is already beginning to rethink those principles.

Evidence, please? I can see that he is beginning to regret the likely consequences to his person of the path he has followed. It's a long way backwards from there to his principles.
wemyss From: wemyss Date: May 1st, 2006 02:36 pm (UTC) (Link)

Thanks.

I'm sorry, I hadn't realised there was anything odd about the font. I'll look into that.

Smith has a grudge. You are quite right to note that he doesn't yet realise it. One may possess something without being aware of the fact, of course.

DLS of course is Dorothy Sayers; AJ Hall has written a justly well-regarded Potterfic with a Golden Age detective story tone and form. I merely adduced the example of how we all of us have our models in the craft.

I quite agree that Draco's initial wavering is prudential, not to say selfish. However, he must at least be rethinking the notion that the Dark Lord - who, as he now knows, resorts to threats and hostage taking to get others to do what he, Riddle, has failed to do - is able to command respect as well as obedience, or that Riddle is worth following for any less base motive than fear.
soonest_mended From: soonest_mended Date: May 1st, 2006 06:30 am (UTC) (Link)
I am in desperate and passioniate love with your entire journal and everything you write, and I must friend you.

Hope you don't mind terribly. ;)
wemyss From: wemyss Date: May 1st, 2006 02:28 pm (UTC) (Link)

Honoured, actually.

Welcome to Bedlam.
eagles_rock From: eagles_rock Date: May 1st, 2006 09:31 am (UTC) (Link)
Nods muchly. (Though can see Harry buying Draco a pair of the offending leather trousers for his own entertainment.)

Idle thoughts on a Bank Holiday - if one ran one's father through with a sharpened post, would one call one's son 'Lance'? Takes a certain mentality.
wemyss From: wemyss Date: May 1st, 2006 02:28 pm (UTC) (Link)

(Snort.) Thanks, darling.

If you brought Sirius back from the Veil, would you call him 'Perceval'?

And under what circs does one name a son, 'Bors'?

You, m'dear, are unique.
themolesmother From: themolesmother Date: May 1st, 2006 12:34 pm (UTC) (Link)
Please tell me I’m not the only one who wonders if – given that nomenclature so often is destiny in the Potterverse – there’s not a confrontation brewing between Percy and Neville?

Now there's an interesting idea. It's a lot more interesting than the obvious "Neville gets Bellatrix because she tortured his parents" one.

(I shan’t even discuss some of the wilder overseas misapprehensions about Our Justin, such as the notion that a double-barrelled name suggests that his parents were a leftist married to a feminist.

You know, that one never even ocurred to me until I saw it being commented on at FA. It always seemed bloody obvious that Justin's double-barreled name placed him in a certain class. But then the "hyphenating surnames to demonstrate one's feminist credentials after marriage" thing has yet really to make much of a dent in the UK.

A Redeemed Draco in Book Seven? The ending of Book Six did give me some hope that JKR was heading that way.

I would love to see "a post-War, crankily endearing, lovably exasperating Draco Malfoy. In fact, a richly comic character, part upper-class twit, part Oscar Wilde, part Colonel Blimp, with a dash of, say, Boris Johnson tossed in." However, if JKR's not going to oblige there's always your good self.

Very interesing essay.

MM


wemyss From: wemyss Date: May 1st, 2006 02:24 pm (UTC) (Link)

Thank you, dear.

You're too kind.

Whatever comes of it all, we'll have had fun, won't we?
wolfsbaine From: wolfsbaine Date: May 1st, 2006 12:35 pm (UTC) (Link)

RE:

My own preference, with reference to the Flight Over Bristol (not to be confused entirely with either the Flight Into Egypt or the Flight of the Earls) on All Hallows’s Eve 1981, is for Somerset, although a Gloucs address would certainly make things easy for Hagrid also.

Of course this might be the way I read this map

http://www.psnw.com/~bashford/b-uk2.gif

But to fly over Bristol on your way to Surrey would pretty much rule out anywhere that isn't on the Welsh side of the Bristol channel. You would be diverting over Bristol from any of the counties on the English side.
wemyss From: wemyss Date: May 1st, 2006 02:22 pm (UTC) (Link)

I had best elaborate.

Clearly, a straight-line route from anywhere in the West to Staines / Little Whinging doesn't involve flying over Brizzle. By the same token, it doesn't take all that amount of time, either: a flying Norton presumably doesn't dawdle in the fashion of Wessex / Great Western trains. There is a period of time between Hagrid's leaving Godric's with the Sprog Who Lived and his arriving chez Dursley that is unaccounted for. For part of that time, I imagine, Hagrid had taken Harry and hid him away (perhaps in Lily's ancestral Wales), and I also suspect that Hagrid did not fly a straight-line route, as a precautionary measure, when he left whatever intervening hiding place that was Somewhere That Wasn't Godric's to take Harry to Little Whinging.

I also submit that Godric's Hollow is not likely to have been in Wales because Wales already boasts one Founder, Helga, and two would be over-egging the pudding.

Thank you for nudging me into better specificity.
avus From: avus Date: May 1st, 2006 04:24 pm (UTC) (Link)
As always a delight, in writing & thought! I especially enjoyed your comments on Draco, who he is, and who he's likely to become. He's more a Black than a Malfoy. Of course! But being Yank -- or perhaps just dim -- I didn't notice. I'm not schooled to think like that. You had his relationship to Lucius very well put.

On the "I'm not schooled to think like that" front, and responding to some comments: Class has, as I'm sure you know, a much different history & meaning on this side of the pond. First, except for "middle class" and, to a lesser extent, "working class", the use of the word "class" is forbidden in American politics. And discussion of US class is almost entirely in "your possessions", i.e., economic terms.

(Actually, it's more economics than "possessions". To give an example, my wife & I both have a piece of furniture -- nothing "nice" at all -- that was our family for c. 200 yrs. I don't know of another Yank, not one, who can say the same.)

Here, class also refers to quality, not background per se. I remember a U of Chic Prof referring to someone coming in from a Lesser U, as NOCD -- Not Our Class Dear. It was a jest, but not entirely.

Our current President, about whom we utterly disagree, is a case-in-point. With the exception of the Roosevelts, we haven't had anyone of our Upper Classes (Kennedy, of course, was a Johnny-come-lately.) since, I suspect the Virginia Mafia right at the start. And W does that cornpone piece which, I suspect, would never be considered in UK.

Please correct me, as my knowledge of Brit society is not firsthand, but to refer to the Upper Classes in UK is simply a descriptive term, a kind of shorthand for the nobility, and a not uncommon useage. We are denied that term in the States. It simply doesn't exist, except economically, and then it would be hotly denied. To bring it up, politically, would be suicide. It's the hidden subtext of American politics, much more carefully buried than issue of race or gender or sexuality.

That poll, I fear, doesn't surprise me. Evidently she was polling people w/ little knowledge outside the US. (And that's a far-too-common condition here. Listen to our news, and you'll get a sense of how insular we are. Well beyond "Continent Cut Off".) They were simply responding as unaware Yanks.

But as usual, I ramble.

Thanks so much for the lullaby referral. It goes on my CD wish-list. (And after taxes and before the June payment, it's unmentionable with She Who Must Be Obeyed -- with good reason.) Hope you & yours are well.

wemyss From: wemyss Date: May 1st, 2006 06:57 pm (UTC) (Link)

Thank you, Gaffer.

And yet....

All over the West, there is a trend, is there not, to the demotic (after all, by birth, GWB is firmly U in US terms, surely?), various Claudians becoming Clodius-types in the alleged era of the common man. Look at the higher echelons of Labour over the years: many officers-and-gentlemen, such as Attlee, have been the leaders. And I recall one scholar's saying, about Fussell's work on class in America, that it was an accurate view of the Dirty Little Secret - except as to the South.

Lots to mull, here. Hmmm....
tree_and_leaf From: tree_and_leaf Date: May 1st, 2006 05:59 pm (UTC) (Link)
I am so sick of people who think Slughorn is a paedophile, or in the Voldemort class of evil, for whatever reason.

I know a number of people (dons, of course) who are very like Slughorn. But then, if he was a muggle, he'd obviously be an Oriel fellow...
wemyss From: wemyss Date: May 1st, 2006 06:45 pm (UTC) (Link)

Quite likely.

Or a Student of Christ Church.

Only before, say, 1950, cd he have been a Balliol don.
tree_and_leaf From: tree_and_leaf Date: May 1st, 2006 07:37 pm (UTC) (Link)
Do you think redeemed! Malfoy would affect wine coloured cords?

I hope not. But it's still better than Armani. Or the Leather Trousers of Doom.
wemyss From: wemyss Date: May 2nd, 2006 02:04 pm (UTC) (Link)

Er. Ah. Well....

Here's hoping for simple cavalry twill instead.
woman_ironing From: woman_ironing Date: May 3rd, 2006 10:03 am (UTC) (Link)

Rambles

I'd got the impression that Godric's Hollow might be somewhere near Durham because of St Godric who lived in a cave around there.

Interesting reading all these comments on class. What are the classes in the UK now? Is there still a working class? Aren't most people middle, sort of - or perhaps middling? What about the toffs, what do we call them? Upper class seems a bit clumsy. Perhaps nowadays class is designated by those categories advertisers use, ABC1, D, whatever. I think I'll go for just two classes: cobbling-it-together-class (most people)and fuck-off-class (toffs).

Draco MUST join Harry. Harry MUST offer Draco his hand in friendship. PLEASE. Hasn't it been set up that way from the start? They are such marvellous opposites and Voldemort can only be vanquished by uniting opposites. I don't see it as a redemption of Draco but as a choice made by Draco. He could choose to follow Voldemort and so continue as Harry's opposite and enemy, but I think that the James/Lupin/Sirius/Pettigrew/Lily/Snape generation already shows the awful results of enmity. With a bit of luck Harry will learn this lesson and offer his friendship to Draco and Draco will get the message and say yes.
wemyss From: wemyss Date: May 3rd, 2006 01:53 pm (UTC) (Link)

The County Palatine?

Hmmm. But that wd make Nev, Tom, AND Harry all Northerners. (Mull, speculate, dodder about absent-mindedly....)

Surely there is a still a working class: why else has the PM kept Prescott around all this time, but as a sop?

And I hope as fervently as do you that, when Major Strasser gets shot and the fog rolls in, Harry and Draco will agree: 'Louie, I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship' and All That.
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