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The latest at the Torygraph. - Wemyss's Appalling Hobby:
From the Party Guilty of Committing 'Gate of Ivory, Gate of Horn'
wemyss
wemyss
The latest at the Torygraph.

My latest, on Mr Speaker and the conventions of the House
(
http://tinyurl.com/6yzspqo
or
http://my.telegraph.co.uk/gmwwemyss/gmwwemyss/15901422/mr-speaker-bercow-making-the-%E2%80%98first-commoner-of-the-land%E2%80%99-common-as-muck/)

3 comments or Leave a comment
Comments
steepholm From: steepholm Date: January 17th, 2011 09:46 pm (UTC) (Link)
I'm a little bothered by the repeated collocation "courtesies and conventions", which I suspect is much closer to being a tautology for you than it is for me, with my Quakerish background.

For you, perhaps, courtesy consists in large part in the respecting of conventions such as those represented by the Speaker's costume. Why would one want to offend the sensibilities of those who, for whatever reason (be it no more than a sentimental attachment to the ways of their fathers) wish to maintain tradition? To break moulds in a spirit of mere iconoclasm, or of childish rebellion against precedent, or attention seeking, or from a facile wish to "embrace change", may well be philistine; and perhaps some combination of these do indeed exhaust Bercow's motives. But these are not the only reasons one might wish to take a step implying that Members of Parliament ought to be able to remember what their duties and responsibilities are without requiring the visual cue of a pair of knee britches.

(I love the idea of Winston as a prime example of a Commoner, by the way!)
wemyss From: wemyss Date: January 17th, 2011 10:35 pm (UTC) (Link)

Ah.

The c&c are by way of being a term of art, and Speaker Bercow made reference to it in his latest strop.

And I suppose my problem w Mr Speaker is that he wishes to assert certain privileges when it suits him whilst undertaking no uncomfortable duties, it appears.

And WSC refused a peerage in part because he wished to be always a House of Commons man, so in that sense....
steepholm From: steepholm Date: January 18th, 2011 09:44 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: Ah.

You're right, in that sense WSC is very much a commoner, Blenheim notwithstanding.

Perhaps an even stronger claim to be the quintessential commoner could be made by Tony Benn or possibly Quintin Hogg, who went so far as to acquire commonness (though Hogg later let it slip through his fingers). Many are born common; some may have it thrust upon them, a fate Jeffrey Archer has unaccountably avoided to date; but few indeed are those who can claim to have achieved it.
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